10 Steps To Fold an Origami Crane

Here is a quick post on how to fold an Origami Crane in 10 steps.

The word ‘Origami’ comes from 2 Japanese words. “Ori” refers to the meaning of “to fold” and “kami” means “paper”.

In Japan, it is believed the crane could live to a thousand years. Making this flying creature as mysterious as a cat having nine lives.

And the symbolism of paper crane is longevity and fortune. Another meaning to it is “birds of happiness”.

This is more of an Asian custom of believe for Japanese, Korean, and Chinese.

Generally, to word it simpler and relatable to the Western culture would be Good Vibes.

How to fold Origami Crane
How to fold Origami Crane
Origami crane 1
Origami crane 1
Origami crane 2
Origami crane 2

Twitter Gets its New Look on April Fool’s Day

It’s April Fool’s day. This morning, I login to my Twitter account and discovered the brand new interface. User account and followers profile page are almost completely revamped.

After all this years on twitter with single column post, I wasn’t getting used to Twitter new look, especially, this happened on April Fool’s Day.

My immediate response was like “is this for real?(!), you must be joking!”.

It took me quite a while to finally realized I’m already using the new look.

The main columns of tweets has been presented in grid formats. On top of that format, it also featured with larger font’s size, which I think it might be a plus point for Twitter users with long sighted problems, and it does grab more attention for those perfect eyesight.

The retweet and reply remain the same. The profile description is shifted to the left columns, just above the photos gallery box and below your profile photo.

What has caught me with most interest is that, together with profile description, your joined date is also displayed therein. Perhaps, by popular demand to display the essentials and establishment date.

In general, every published post is viewed in grids, ranging from long banner type to square grids. Post with photos and youtube videos get the maximum space for much better attention.

The latter might have closely related to Billboard Twitter Real-Time Chart, which recently described in Twitter’s blog as

“…the new industry standard for tracking and surfacing the conversation around music as it happens.”

It simply signaling to users theses particular type of post gets priority on post ranking.

And the new look is quite like in the way of 3-columns format for account user interface, and 4-columns format for your follower’s profile page.

Below sharing screenshot of Twitter new look from User Account page.

Columns to show Following of Twitter user
Columns to show Following of Twitter user
Twitter Follower Profile, New Look, @Susanjmccann
Twitter Follower Profile, New Look, @Susanjmccann
Image Post of frame size 4x3
Image Post of frame size 4×3
Twitter New Look, Photo Post Maximized
Twitter New Look, Photo Post Maximized
Twitter New Profile Look, Front Page
Twitter New Profile Look, Front Page
Sharing Twitter Post with Bigger Fonts iin Grids
Sharing Twitter Post with Bigger Fonts iin Grids

William Morris, Evolution of Design in Commercial Industry

William Morris (1834 – 1896) was an artist, designer, printer, typographer, bookbinder, craftsman, poet, writer and champion of socialist ideals. Above all, he was also a leading member of Art and Crafts Movement.

William Morris‘ idealistic approach by mean of art design had greatly contributed on the relation of art appreciation with commercial industry. Both aspects are to be closely related.

By applying fine visual aestheticism to production of commercial design has, thus, become the key stage in evolution of design as we know today.

Design goes from decorative stained glass to commercial textile, and impressive wallpaper to ornamental border for press materials.

Below sharing his fine collection of print fabric and wallpapers.

Almost all the designs we use for surface decoration, wallpapers, textiles, and the like, I design myself. I have had to learn the theory and to some extent the practice of weaving, dyeing and textile printing: all of which I must admit has given me and still gives me a great deal of enjoyment. – William Morris (1834 – 1896)

Acanthus embroidered panel, designed Morris, 1890
Acanthus embroidered panel, designed Morris, 1890
Snakeshead printed textile, 1876
Snakeshead printed textile, 1876
Tulip and Willow, 1873, William Morris
Tulip and Willow, 1873, William Morris
Wallpaper - Hyacinth, pattern #480 - 1915-17, William Morris
Wallpaper – Hyacinth, pattern #480 – 1915-17, William Morris
Design for Windrush printed textile, 1881–83
Design for Windrush printed textile, 1881–83